Archive for February, 2014


The Setting Sun

The Setting Sun: A Memoir of Empire and Family Secrets by Bart Moore-Gilbert

To be released May 14, 2014

I found this book to be a rather slow read, as the text was really dense, but it definitely got easier to read the more you got into it. I really enjoyed the snippets of memories about his father as a game keeper in Tanzania and his growing up there, which were interspersed among the narrative about the author and his father’s past. Although I know about the expansiveness of the British Empire, I sometimes forget that were British citizens living in Africa, outside of South Africa.

What would you do if you found out that your father, a man you always idolized, was not who he seemed to be? That is just what happened to the author, after being contacted by an Indian historian researching the Parallel Government, right before the Indian Independence from Britain. So the author sets out on a quest to discover the truth about his father, who was stationed there during the last days of the Raj (the period of the British dominion in India), and his role with the Indian Police from 1938-1947. Through the course of the author’s investigation into his father, I learned more about British-controlled India and the Indians’ first attempts at becoming their own separate country, and about how terrorism is perceived throughout the world. Because of his trip to India, the author is able to have some closure on his father’s death, and reconcile how he saw his father versus how his father really was as a man and as a professional. 3 stars.

Disclaimer: I received this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

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Dust of Eden by Mariko Nagai

dust of eden

Dust of Eden by Mariko Nagai

To be 100% honest, this is only the second children and young adult book, and third book overall that I’ve read on the Japanese-American internment camps during WWII. There’s not a whole lot of literature on the subject, though there should be. This is one of those events that Americans should never forget because even though it wasn’t as bad as the German concentration camps, it was still wrong to discriminate and punish Americans simply because of their ancestry (though this has sadly been the case in one aspect or another throughout our country’s history). Overall I enjoyed the book, even though it couldn’t quite decide the story wanted to be told like an actual novel or a verse-novel (it kind of switched back and forth). I loved the cover photo by Dorothea Lang. It just completely describes the sadness and hopelessness the Japanese-Americans must have felt at being singled out and isolated from their fellow countrymen. Plus she’s a child, so it just makes it seem so much worse.

The story is about a 12 year old Japanese-American girl from Seattle named Mina. She lives with her grandfather, he only speaks to her in Japanese and calls her by her Japanese middle name, Mariko. She also lives with her parents and her older brother Nick. The story starts in Oct 1941 and the catalyst of the book is the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941 by the Japanese. This sets in motion the movement of 120,000 Japanese-Americans to internment camps, where they remained for the duration of the War against Japan. Mina and her family, like most Japanese-Americans, felt rather conflicted during this time. On one hand, they were Americans and proud to be so, but on the other hand, their ancestry and cultural heritage is from Japan. It is interesting to note, and something Mina points out in the book, that though Americans of German or Italian descent were somewhat discriminated against during WWII, they weren’t segregated like the Japanese.

Mina and her family must leave their house in Seattle and are sent first to a staging area in Washington state, where they were forced to live in a horse stall at a former fair ground, before being sent on to Idaho. They end up outside a little town called Eden, which started out as a barren dusty wasteland, but with the green thumb of the confined citizens, turns into something more evocative of the outside town’s name. Mina’s grandfather even manages to grow roses at the camp, despite limited resources. Her brother Nick fights against being a captive and “escapes” to the army to fight in the European theater as soon as he is able. Mina spends most of the book writing letters to her father, who was separated from the rest of the family (but later joins them), her white best friend Jaime with whom she shares half a heart necklace, and later Nick. They do eventually manage to return home to Seattle, though all are changed forever. Recommended for ages 12+, 4 stars.

Disclaimer: I received this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

Book Reviews Feb 2014

This year I am trying to read at least 300 books again. I’m doing pretty well so far, having read 39 books. I’m hoping to tackle more Newbery books in audiobook format as they are usually so short, and I’m on a bit of an audiobook lull at the moment (at least in regards to adult books). I finally finished Book 3 of the Song of Ice and Fire series (Game of Thrones to the uninitiated). I’m currently reading an ARC called The Setting Sun: A Memoir of Empire and Family Secrets by Bart Moore-Gilbert. I’m currently listening to another Newbery-winning book The Higher Power of Lucky by Susan Patron.

As always, I rate things from 1 – 5 stars, one being the lowest and 5 being the highest. The Caldecott Challenge, which I started last May, is my attempt to read all of the Caldecott Honors and Award winners from 1938 – the present. I’m also completing a Newbery Challenge, where I’m reading all the award winners and at least one honor book. I will include some photos of illustrations that I like with the reviews.

Children

The Goodnight Train written by June Sobel, illustrated by Laura Huliska-Beith

The Goodnight Train

Feeding into my son’s train fascination, this book is another great example of imaginative writing. Set to a rhyming text, the story is about a train full of beds and small children that is going through a magical countryside, on the way to Dreamland. My son loves this book and has requested it pretty much every night for a week. Recommended for ages 2-6, 4 stars.

I Love Trains! written by Philomen Sturges and illustrated by Shari Halpern

This was a cute but very simple book about a young boy who loves trains, not only the different parts of the train, but also because his daddy works in the caboose of one. I like the brightly colored blocky illustrations, which are perfect for toddlers. Recommended for ages 2-6, 3 stars.

No T. Rex in the Library written by Toni Buzzeo, illustrated by Sachiko Yoshikawa

I like books about the library and am always on the lookout for picture books in that setting. I figured this one would interest my son as it has dinosaurs. A woman puts her daughter Tess in time-out for ten minutes for being a “little beastie” in the library and causing mischief, and while there Tess imagines a T Rex coming out of one of the books she knocked over and causing plenty more mischief and mayhem in the library, including ripping books. For this, Tess punishes the dinosaur by putting it in time out and back inside its book. I get that they’re trying to teach kids to have good behavior in the library, but that message kind of gets lost about halfway through the book.  My son loves it though, mostly just because there is a roaring rampaging dinosaur, so this book gets three stars from me instead of two. Recommended for ages 3-6, 3 stars.

The Boy Who Loved Trains written by Jill Kalz, illustrated by Sahin Erkocak

I picked this one up because my son likes trains. Not the best book, as I thought the story fell a little flat and the illustrations weren’t that good, but it would be good for a beginning reader, which is the intended audience. The book is about a young boy who is obsessed with trains, in fact the only words he will say is “Woo! Woo!”. It is his birthday and he gets a new present from his aunt, a shiny race car, so soon afterwards he is obsessed with cars and the only words he will say is “Vroom! Vroom!”. My son enjoyed the book more than me. Recommended for ages 3-6, 2 stars.

The Little Engine that Could written by Watty Piper, illustrated by Loren Long

I never really wanted to read this book, though of course I knew about it as it has been around since 1930. Again, influenced by my son, I picked it up in desperation after not being able to find many train books at the library. I actually enjoyed the story, though it is rather lengthy for reading out loud to small children. My son loved the story though, so that made it worth it.

A small happy train is pulling cargo of toys and good things to eat for the boys and girls on the other side of the mountain, when he suddenly breaks down. The toys ask three passing trains to help them to get to the children before daybreak, but each refuse. When all seems lost, a fourth smaller train happens by and she agrees to take them, though she has never hauled cargo before. All the way up the mountain, she chugs “I Think I Can” to herself, and manages to make it to the top. The toys are ecstatic as they make their way down to the little town in the valley of the mountain. This is a cute story that teaches children about determination and perseverance. Recommended for ages 3-7, 4 stars.

The Caboose Who Got Loose written and illustrated by Bill Peet

THE CABOOSE WHO GOT LOOSE

I’ve been fascinated by Bill Peet ever since I read his autobiography for the Caldecott Challenge. I knew he wrote some children’s books, but had no idea that he did so many (34 total). His work reminded me a lot of Dr Seuss, with the crazy rhymes for the book. I guess you have to get pretty creative when working with the word “caboose”. He worked for Walt Disney and you can definitely see the influence in the way he draws houses and even Katy Caboose, from his work on the animated shorts Susie the Little Blue Coupe and The Little House.  I loved the rhyming storyline and it had great illustrations. As this was a train-related book, my son kept wanting me to read it over and over to him.

Katy spends her day at the end of a very long freight train and longs to be free and surrounded by nature. It is only after she is near a switchman’s house that wants to be her because her life looks so glamorous that she gains appreciation for herself. Her wish for freedom is unexpectedly granted when the train she is hooked up to is coming up a steep curvy mountain track, and she is accidentally uncoupled. She flies off the track and is caught between two evergreen trees and the rescue team is unable to find her. And so she lives out the rest of her days in nature with a great view. Highly recommended for ages 3-7, 5 stars.

Smokey written and illustrated by Bill Peet

Yay for Bill Peet! While I didn’t like this one as much as Katy the Caboose, my son kept wanting me to read it. Smokey is an old engine who is a bit worn down. After overhearing some other engines talk about how will be retired to the junk yard, he decides to go on an adventure. He is chased by Native Americans who misinterpret his smoke signals (this part was a little racist, but the book was written in the 1960s, so congruent with the times). He is almost run off the rails by a fast freight train and end up in a farmer’s duck pond. After the farmer complains to the North Central Line, they come and rescue him and bring him back to the train yard. His smoke stack has been bent in his fall into the pond, and now he can puff letters and numbers. A teacher returning from summer vacation sees the letters and gets her school board to buy Smokey from the North Central Line, where the kids fix him up. He goes from a sad black and white engine to a colorful one, after the kids paint him. He learns simple words and happily teaches the kids for many years. Recommended for ages 3-7, 3 1/2 stars.

Steam Train, Dream Train written by Sherrie Duskey Rinker and illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld

Steam Train Dream Train - Turtle Cars

I loved the book Goodnight Goodnight Construction Site, as it was a great book for my son, so when I found out the author/illustrator did a train book, I leapt at the chance to read it. She did not disappoint. How can kids not love a book with trains, animals, and dinosaurs! The book tells the rhyming story of a group of animals who help load a train with supplies and when the finish, they board the train and go to sleep. My son especially liked the polar bears and penguins loading ice cream, the elephants loading colorful paint and the dinosaurs. It has fantastic illustrations that really draw you into the story. Recommended for ages 3-7, 5 stars.

Sidney, Stella, and the Moon written and illustrated by Emily Yarlett

Sidney, Stella and the Moon

I picked this one up in the New Book section of the Children’s Room. It looked interesting and it was about the moon, which my son loves reading about, so I gave it a try. I must have British book radar, because I always seem to gravitate towards British writers, even if I have no idea where they are from are to begin with. I really liked the artwork, which was a blend of digital art and collage. The story was kind of boring though.

Sidney and Stella are twins who do everything together. One day, they are fighting over a bouncy ball, when it slips from their grasp, bounces way up and shatters the moon. What are two children to do! Why, they must fix it before anyone can find out. Of course, it is all over the news so it is not a secret for long. Sidney eventually finds a partially eaten round of cheese to replace the moon and with his sister’s help, the put it back in the sky. Recommended for ages 4-7, 3 stars.

No Such Thing written and illustrated by Bill Peet

This was an odd book. It was almost like Peet was trying too hard to be like Dr. Seuss with his descriptions of crazy original creatures and their abilities. My favorites were the colorful narcissistic horses called Fandangoes and the Snoofs, mountain goats whose horns are so long they can use them for skis. Recommended for ages 4-7, 2 1/2 stars.

The Adventures of Obadiah written and illustrated by Brinton Turkle

The Adventures of Obadiah

I love Obadiah! He is so precious. I was so excited after having read the Caldecott honor winning book Thy Friend, Obadiah by the same author, that he did a few more books on our Quaker boy Obadiah.

In this book, Obadiah keeps getting in trouble with his teacher and family for telling outrageous fibs. The family’s big event in the story is a sheep shearing and fair, where they go with all the other Quaker families to socialize. Obadiah is warned against going to the sideshow tents. While there, he is separated from his family but finally makes his way back to them at the end of the day. He tells them what seems like another crazy story about him riding an out-of-control sheep when he was saved by a sideshow performer who showed him around the area. He got to see fire-eaters and go dancing. That is pretty exciting stuff for a young Quaker boy. They don’t believe him, until his story is confirmed by a neighbor. Recommended for ages 4-8, 5 stars.

Tea Rex: A Young Person’s Guide to Tea Party Etiquette written and illustrated by Molly Idle

Tea Rex

I really picked this up for me rather than my son, though I thought he might like the dinosaur. I enjoyed the concept of this book, but the execution would be hard for small children to enjoy. A lot of the story ideas were visual, which were hard to explain to a two-year old. It would be fun for a slightly older child who can pick up on visual clues.

The book is a guide for children who want to have a tea party and shows the correct and not-so-correct ways to handle guests and put on a successful tea party. As a child who grew up with tea parties, both real and imagined, I found the idea of a huge roaring T Rex trying to be genteel and hold a cup of tea hilarious, and the pictures made it even more so. Recommended for ages 5-8, 4 stars.

The Flying Tortoise: An Igbo Tale retold by Tololwa M. Mollel, illustrated by Barbara Spurll

The Flying Tortoise

I found this book at the library book sale this weekend and picked it up because I love folktales and my son loves turtles. The story reminded me of the West African stories about Anansi the spider, as he is also a trickster, although Mbeku the tortoise seems much more greedy and unredeemable compared to Anansi.

The story comes from the Igbo people of Nigeria. Mbeku the tortoise had a beautiful shiny shell. He tricked the birds into giving him their feathers and becoming their spokesman after they were all invited to the Skyland for a feast. Mbeku got his friend the lizard to create some wings for him, which he uses to fly up with the birds and eat all their food. In punishment, they destroy his wings and leave him stranded in the sky. He plans on jumping down, but after the birds learn that he has fooled them for a third time, they sabotage his soft landing. Mbeku falls and breaks his shell, and his friend the lizard tries to repair it but it is now rugged and ugly. Recommended for ages 5-10, 4 stars.

Caldecott Challenge

Fish in the Air written and illustrated by Kurt Wiese

I managed to slip this short read into our bedtime story routine in one night. The book won a 1949 Caldecott Honor. This is only my second Kurt Wiese book but he seems to predominantly write books about China and the books are a little dated, as evidenced by the clothing in the story. This was a cute story about a young Chinese boy named Young Fish who wants to fly the biggest Fish kite. His father, Old Fish, buys it for him and on the way to flying it, Young Fish promptly gets swept away by a strong wind and end up in the river. He is caught by a napping fisherman, and rescued by his father. He quickly decides that he would much rather have the smallest fish kite. Recommended for ages 3-7, 3 stars.

Bambino the Clown written and illustrated by Georges Screiber

I wasn’t a huge fan of this book because it just came off as super creepy and slightly pedophilic to me, though I know it wouldn’t have been considered this way when it was written. It won a 1948 Caldecott Honor. Bambino the Clown is a man who sees a little boy crying and decides to take him under his wing by inviting him back to his house to see how he turns himself into a clown. He is invited to the circus the next day and we are treated to Bambino’s show with his seal companion Flapper. Recommended for ages 4 – 7, 2 ½ stars.

Children and YA

The Mark of the Dragonfly by Jaleigh Johnson

The House of Hades (Heroes of Olympus #4) by Rick Riordan, narrated by Nick Chamain

This book was a non-stop action fest, but also had plenty of character development as well to keep the story going. As usual, this series introduces me to lesser-known Greek and Roman mythology that I might not have seen unless I was very thorough. I applaud Rick Riordan for his addition of a gay main character, something I’ll admit I wasn’t expecting from a well-known children/young adult author who also happens to be Southern (I am also Southern and unfortunately we are not known for our open-mindedness – with exceptions of course).

The story picked up right where The Mark of Athena left off. Frank, Piper, Hazel, Leo, and Jason are taking the Athena Parthenos statue to Epirus, Greece to stop Gaia and close Doors of Death from the mortal side. Nico has joined the crew as well, as is the only one who can locate the doors. Meanwhile, Percy and Annabeth who fell into Tartarus in the last book are attempting to close the Doors from the Underworld. Only no mortal has ever survived walking through Tartarus, so there is a lot of pressure from their end. All of the demigods do a lot of growing up in this book, which in Frank’s case is literal and everyone else’s figuratively. The Greek and Roman gods are warring with each other, so they’re no help at all. The demigods must rely on themselves and each other if they are going to get through this. The book ended on a cliffhanger though, so I’m dying to know what happens next (have to wait a year till next book comes out L). Recommended for ages 10+, 5 stars.

            Newbery

The Dark-thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural written by Patricia C. McKissack, illustrated by Brian Pinkney

I probably would not have picked this book up except that it won a 1993 Newbery Honor and a Coretta Scott King Author award. But I’m very glad I did. The book is a fascinating glimpse into African-American folktales from the Southeastern US. I’ve never heard any of them. Patricia McKissack is a fabulous storyteller. There’s a little bit of everything in this book: ghosts, voodoo, Sasquatch, daring escapes, demons and protector spirits and monsters. The woodcut illustrations by Brian Pinkney are great, though I wish there were more of them. My favorites were “We Organized”, “The Woman in the Snow”, and “The Gingi”. Recommended for ages 7-12, 5 stars.

A Single Shard written by Linda Sue Park, narrated by Graeme Malcolm

At first, I was wondering why they picked this particular narrator to voice a story about a young Asian boy, but Graeme Malcolm had a very nice range of different voices and intonations and did an excellent job. I could picture Tree Ear in my mind after listening to his narration and really rooting for him to succeed. This book made me smile and cry, but still ended on a happy note.

Tree Ear is an orphaned boy about twelve years old who lives with his friend one-legged Crane-Man under a bridge in Ch’ulp’o, a small Korean village, a place known for its fine celadon pottery. One day, Tree Ear’s curiosity gets the better of him and he accidentally breaks a piece done by Min, the finest potter in the village. As penance, he has to do back-breaking labor for nine days for free. After completing this, he is taken on as an apprentice to Min, though he will not let him throw a pot on the pottery wheel. To create a beautiful vase is Tree Ear’s dream, so he is heartbroken. One day, an emissary comes to the village to select a potter for a royal commission. One of the other potters in town Kang has created a new style of incising designs into the pottery. He gets a royal commission because it is new and different, but the emissary prefers Min’s work as Kang is not as skillful. Tree Ear is charged with bringing two vases with the incised style done in Min’s more skilled hand to the emissary. Will he be able to make it? If he does, will he finally learn how to throw pots? To find out, read this beautifully written book, which won a 2002 Newbery award. Recommended for ages 9-12, 5 stars.

Young Adult

Library Wars: Love and War, Volume 9 written and illustrated by Kiiro Yumi

I had totally forgot about this series until I was browsing manga on my local library’s website the other day. This series is a little predictable, but I still enjoy it and want Kasahara to find true love, whether or not that turns out to be her “prince”.

In this volume, Kasahara is acting as bait for a groper in the library, who felt up the deaf girl Marie. Once the groper is caught, Marie is given a whistle to blow in an emergency. Since finding out that Instructor Dojo is her “prince”, things have been awkward between the two, especially after she blurts out that she’s grown out of her prince one day. The test for the next rank of Sergeant is coming up, and Kasahara and Tezuki have to take a written test and a skills test, which involves entertaining a group of kids. Kasahara passes the skills test with flying colors, and barely passes the written (thanks to tutoring from Instructor Dojo), while Tezuki aces the written and manages to hold the attention of the children. Kasahara realizes that despite her best efforts, she may be falling for Instructor Dojo for real. Recommended for ages 13+, 4 stars

Library Wars: Love and War, Volume 10 written and illustrated by Kiiro Yumi

In this volume, the enemy of the Library Task Force (the Media Betterment Committee) is censoring a piece of artwork in the Museum of Modern Art in the hometown of Kasahara, and she is chosen along with Dojo and the others to represent the Task Force in the town. They are going to protect the freedom of speech of the artist. The only problem with this is that Kasahara’s parents do not like the idea of her being in the Task Force to begin with, as they say it is unladylike. Once there, Kasahara is tormented by the female librarians, who do not like that she is there with the Task Force. She manages to work her way through it and holds her own, which Dojo praises. The bonus manga was very fascinating, and makes me wonder if Dojo really likes Kasahara as well. Can’t wait till the next volume comes out! Recommended for ages 13+, 4 stars.

Adult

Madam: A Novel of New Orleans by Cari Lynn and Kelli Martin

At the King’s Table: Royal Dining Through the Ages by Susanne Groome

As I am fascinated by British Royalty and food history, this seemed like a very appropriate topic for me to read. It gives a history of royal dining from the time of Richard II in the mid 14th century to the present day. As far as styles of cooking goes, there was a lot of French influence on the British court, depending on whether or not they were at war with the French at that time or not. The earlier courts pretty much up until King George II had prodigious appetites, then there was a lull during the reign of Mad King George III due to his illness and his wife’s pickiness. The banqueting picked up again during George IV’s reign as he was a prodigious eater, followed by a lull during the Victorian era due to Victoria and Albert’s strict upbringing of their children, and renewed again by their son Edward VI. He was a lover of all things French and it was during the Edwardian era that the French style of cooking really came into prominence in Great Britain. Once you get into modern times, the World Wars effectively put an end to the multiple-course menus. I loved all the illustrations in the book, which really set the stage for the history. Highly recommended, 5 stars.

A Storm of Swords: A Song of Ice and Fire #3 by George R.R. Martin

I thought the last book was crazy, but this one was even more so. I ended up giving this book 4 1/2 instead of 5 stars because it really dragged in the beginning and middle. I guess that’s because he was building up so much storyline to really sock it to you at the end, and boy did he. I mean how ballsy is the author to kill off 3 ½ major characters (the half part is explained in the epilogue) and at least two secondary characters all in the second half of the story!

This book picks up about where the other book left off. First, we visit the Starks and family, which leads into the rest of the major characters. Catelyn Stark has gotten this crazy idea in her head that if she releases Jaime Lannister to the care of Brienne of Tarth (her sworn protector after Renly Baratheon was killed in the previous book), and delivers him to King’s Landing that Cersei will give her back Sansa and Arya. So she does and that causes a mighty uproar with her son Robb, the King in the North, as he was a valuable bargaining chip. We actually get to see Jaime as a real person and not just as the “Kingslayer”. Jon Snow has joined the wildings, under orders from a Night Watch superior, to see what they are planning for the Black Brothers. He definitely gets a little life experience under his belt after he claims Ygritte for his own. I found the character of Mance Rayder to be particularly interesting as there were only hints of his character before. John really came into his own in this book and grew up a bit.

Arya is still on the run and falls into the hands of Lord Beric Dondarrion, the lightning lord, who runs with group of commoners. He is another follower of the Lord of Light. She spends some time with the Hound, who has been on the run ever since Stannis Baratheon was defeated at the Battle for King’s Landing. She also manages to tick a few names off her death wish list, some through her actions and some through others. Bran, Hodor and the Reed heirs (retainers of his father) have escaped from Winterfell and are heading North. King Joffrey breaks his marriage plans to Sansa and is engaged to be married to Margery Tyrell, the former wife of Renly Baratheon. Sansa spends most of the book being bullied by Joffrey and his thugs. After the Battle for King’s Landing, and despite his great role in protecting the city, Tyrion is essentially discarded and his father Tywin takes over the role of Hand to the King. Daenerys is becoming totally bad-ass after conquering a few eastern cities and getting a warrior-eunuch army to follow her. The dragons are growing up.

Davos Seaworth gets rescued and brought back to “King” Stannis who first throws him in prison and then names him Hand of the King. The Others, the undead horde that keep following the Night’s Watch, attack the small army set up by Lord Commander Mormont. Samwell Tarly kills one of the Others with an obsidian blade given to him by Jon. Afterwards, they are staying at Craster’s (a wildling who sometimes gives aid to the Black Brothers) house, when some of the remaining Brothers rebel, and kill Mormont. Samwell manages to escape with the help of Gilly, who has just given birth. He must bring them back to Castle Black to safety.  To find out more about the story, read this excellent third book in A Song of Ice and Fire series. 4 1/2 stars.

Murder as a Fine Art written by David Morrell

I picked this book on a recommendation from one of my favorite historical fiction/mystery YA authors, Y.S. Lee. She had read the book and gave it positive reviews for accuracy and I love this type of book so decided to give it a try. I had no idea that the author originally became famous for writing First Blood, the book that first introduced Rambo to the world. Morrell was very thorough in researching for this book, and shares his sources in the back. Although I had never read anything about Thomas de Quincey, I had heard of his famous book. I am definitely interested after reading this book.

A man brutally murders a young family and their servant in the East End of London and the city’s newly created Scotland Yard is on the case. Inspector Ryan and his associate Constable Becker are assigned to the case and begin to explore what might have happened. Eventually they decide to involve the author Thomas de Quincey in the investigation. He is the author of the infamous book The Confessions of an English Opium Eater, the world’s first real book about drug addiction, a very taboo subject during the Victorian era. Thomas de Quincy believes the murders are from a copycat killer of an earlier set of murders done in the same area of Ratcliffe Highway. They are meant to cause panic and riots so that the police won’t be able to catch who is responsible. De Quincey and his daughter Emily help Ryan and Becker, but De Quincey is himself implicated in the murders due to his continued laudanum use and the fact that he knows so much about the earlier killings. Will Ryan and Becker be able to stop the murderer before he strikes again? Will they be able to solve the case and free de Quincey? To find out, read this incredible Victorian thriller. 5 stars.

How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food by Mark Bittman

How can you not love a man who is both detailed in research and precise in cooking directions? I’ve been a fan of Mark Bittman for awhile, and after reading his VB6 book and liking the idea but wanting more vegetarian options, I got this book. This book is a behemoth at about 900 pages, but like I said before, Bittman is very thorough in his description of every kind of vegetable and fruit imaginable, plus whole grains, different kinds of breads and a small dessert section. I figure I found at least 20 new ways to prepare things, but with recipes that won’t overwhelm me. Some of the recipes I’d like to try include Raw Beet Salad, Wheat Berry Salad with Roasted Peppers, Goat Cheese  and Mushroom Tart with Potato Crust, Smashed Edamame and Potatoes with Miso, and Plum Rosemary Upside-Down Cake. 5 stars.

The Mark of the Dragonfly

The Mark of the Dragonfly by Jaleigh Johnson

The Mark of the Dragonfly

I got this book as an advanced reader’s copy from Netgalley, and the summary sounded interesting so I decided to get it a go. The beginning was a little slow, but I quickly found myself invested in the characters and reacting along with them as the story progressed. I especially liked the addition of the feisty green-eyed boy with many talents. This sci-fi book had elements of dystopia and steampunk in it as well.

 The main character Piper is an orphaned junk scrapper on the planet of Solara, in the MerrowKingdom, who makes her living fixing machines that have fallen to the ground from the sky from other planets. Her friend Micah is caught out during the meteor shower and she goes to rescue him. He is unconscious but survives and she also find an unconscious girl who was part of a caravan whose remaining passengers have died. She takes the girl back to her house but she has amnesia and can only remember her name, Anna. Piper discovers a dragonfly tattoo on the girl’s arm. A man comes looking for Anna but Piper doesn’t want to give him to her, as his intentions seem a little sketchy. She runs to the 401, a supply train heading to the neighboring DragonflyKingdom and when they see Anna’s tattoo, they let the both of them on the train heading for the capital city. Will Anna and Piper be able to really escape from the mysterious man who seems determined to keep Anna for himself? Will Anna be able to regain her memory and find her family? To find out, read this exciting adventure. I loved this book and would love to see more books with these characters. Recommended for ages 10+, 5 stars.

Disclaimer: I received this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest  review.

As the mom of a Toddler, I know how annoying it can get to read the same book over and over and over again. I get new books from the library so I don’t have to, but after I return them, my son picks up the same ones to re-read. As a librarian, as the Magpie librarian reiterates here, re-reading a book builds enjoyment of reading, understanding of the words, and of course vocabulary. So read that story your kid keeps requesting, even if it is the 100th time you’ve read it.

The Magpie Librarian: A Librarian's Guide to Modern Life and Etiquette

Each month, my goal is to make and display a sign with an early literacy tip on it. I prop this sucker up right behind the children’s desk. This is my second and it’s based on something I feel pretty strongly about:

Often at my library, I’ll see a child pick up a book, eagerly asking their mother/father/nanny/babysitter/whoever to read it to them. My blood boils when I hear a reply like this: “But we have that book at home!” or “We read that all the time!”

So? Who cares? Read it again!

Not only do I think it’s discouraging to a child to hear that they can’t read a book they’re interested in, but there are many benefits to re-reading (or re-hearing/re-listening to) a story. Any children’s librarian worth her cardigan knows that kids learn through repetition. Re-reading is a great way to learn new words and increase…

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